Buddhist Caves – Bojjannnakonda

Bojjannakonda and Lingalakonda

Bojjannakonda and Lingalakonda are two buddhist rock cut caves on adjacent hillocks, near a village called Sankaram nearly 40 Km from Visakhapatnam, which are dated between 2nd and 8th century CE.

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Bojjannakonda. View from down. The stairway to go up.

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The caves are on two levels, Buddha statues are carved on top of the entrances of both levels. There is an unfinished carving besides the entrance in the lower level.

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A small cave near the entrance. The monks must have had to bend a lot to go in.

The second pic is the main cave on the first tier. It has a stupa and pillars carved, with a pradakshina path around the stupa.

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The climb to the upper tier.                     Buddha carvings on top.

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The first picture is the entrance chamber in the second tier and the second picture is another Buddha in an inner chamber in the second tier.

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The next hillock is Lingalakonda which gets its name due to the numerous stupas on the hillock. The path to go to the biggest stupa on the hillock.

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The biggest stupa is in the first picture and second picture has many more stupas.

These caves were excavated by a team led by Alexander Rim in 1906. It seems all three phases of Buddhism, Hinayana, Mahayana and Vajrayana are featured here. During the excavation, a gold coin of Samudragupta, Some copper coins of Eastern Chalukya king Vishnuvardhana (633 CE), a lead coin which may have been from the Shatavahanas were discovered along with terracotta beads and figures, thereby dating it as 2nd – 6th CE.

It is taken care of by ASI now.

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2 thoughts on “Buddhist Caves – Bojjannnakonda

  1. They’re just so beautiful, each cut and chisel mark in the carvings carries so much history and volumes of information. The area looks so peaceful. I can imagine the kind of simple, fulfilling lives the monks (and students?) must’ve lived here. Thank you for sharing, Sudha!

    Liked by 1 person

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